1

NOAA, January 1998. For land and ocean surfaces combined, the average global temperature of the calendar year 1907 is 0·50ºC below the average global temperature of 16·50ºC for the thirty calendar years from 1961 to 1990, such that the annual global temperature of 1907 is 16·00ºC, which is the lowest annual global temperature for any calendar year from 1900 to 1997.
NOAA, January 2017. For land and ocean surfaces combined, the average global temperature of the calendar year 2016 is 0·94ºC above the average global temperature of 13·9ºC for the one-hundred calendar years from 1901 to 2000, such that the annual global temperature of 2016 is 14·84ºC, which is the highest annual global temperature for any calendar year from 1880 to 2016.

Friday, 30 June 2017

August 1852.

Two claims for the global temperature anomaly of August 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of August 1852 is:-

“Between -0·554ºC and +0·135ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between -0·551ºC and +0·137ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1852 were +27ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 27·554ºC and 26·865ºC too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1852 were -27ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 26·446ºC and 27·135ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1852 were neither +27ºC nor -27ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what number?)ºC and (what number?)ºC too low, or too high?

July 1852.

Two claims for the global temperature anomaly of July 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of July 1852 is:-

“Between -0·331ºC and +0·299ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between -0·327ºC and +0·303ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1852 were +26ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 26·331ºC and 25·701ºC too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1852 were -26ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 25·669ºC and 26·299ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1852 were neither +26ºC nor -26ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what number?)ºC and (what number?)ºC too low, or too high?

June 1852.

Two claims for the global temperature anomaly of June 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of June 1852 is:-

“Between (-0·332 and +0·235)ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between (-0·328 and +0·239)ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1852 were +25ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (25·332 and 24·765)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1852 were -25ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (24·668 and 25·235)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1852 were neither +25ºC nor -25ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC too low, or too high?

May 1852.

The global temperature anomaly of May 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of May 1852 is:-

“Between (-0·525 and +0·095)ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between (-0·518 and +0·102)ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1852 were +24ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (24·525 and 23·905)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1852 were -24ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (23·475 and 24·095)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1852 were neither +24ºC nor -24ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

April 1852.

The global temperature anomaly of April 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of April 1852 is:-

“Between (-0·872 and -0·258)ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between (-0·868 and -0·251)ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1852 were +23ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (23·872 and 23·258)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1852 were -23ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (22·128 and 22·742)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1852 were neither +23ºC nor -23ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

March 1852.

The global temperature anomaly of March 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of March 1852 is:-

“Between (-0·821 and -0·178)ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between (-0·813 and -0·169)ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1852 were +22ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (22·821 and 22·178)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1852 were -22ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (21·179 and 21·822)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1852 were neither +22ºC nor -22ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC too low, or too high?

February 1852.

The global temperature anomaly of February 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of February 1852 is:-

“Between (-0·823 and -0·102)ºC”. This is Claim-1.
“Between (-0·816 and -0·095)ºC”. This is Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1852 were +21ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (21·823 and 21·102) too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1852 were -21ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (20·177 and 20·898)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1852 were neither +21ºC nor -21ºC, then Claim-2 would between  (what two numbers?)ºC too low, or too high?

January 1852.

The global temperature anomaly of January 1852 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of January 1852 is:-

Between (-0·718 and +0·111)ºC. (Claim-1).
Between (-0·714 and +0·115)ºC. (Claim-2).

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1852 were -20ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (19·282 and 20·111)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1852 were +20ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (20·718 and 19·889)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1852 were neither -20ºC nor +20ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC too high, or too low?

December 1851.

The global temperature anomaly of December 1851 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of December 1851 is:-

Between (-0·386 and +0·258)ºC. (Claim-1).
Between (-0·379 and +0·265)ºC. (Claim-2).

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1851 were -19ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (18·614 and 19·258)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1851 were +19ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (19·386 and 18·742)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1851 were neither -19ºC nor +19ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC too high, or too low?

November 1851.

The global temperature anomaly of November 1851 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of November 1851 is:-

Between (-0·357 and +0·301)ºC. (Claim-1).
Between (-0·351 and +0·307)ºC. (Claim-2).

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1851 were +18ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (18·357 and 17·699)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1851 were -18ºC, then Claim-1 would be between (17·643 and 18·301)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1851 were neither +18ºC nor -18ºC, then Claim-2 would be between (what two numbers?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

Thursday, 29 June 2017

October 1851.

The global temperature anomaly of October 1851 as per two editions of The Hadley Centre’s version of HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of October 1851 is:-

Not less than -0·399ºC and not more than +0·285ºC (Claim-1).
Not less than -0·394ºC and not more than +0·289ºC (Claim-2).

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1851 were +17ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 17·399ºC and 16·715ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1851 were -17ºC, then Claim-1 would be between 16·601ºC and 17·285ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1851 were neither +17ºC nor -17ºC, then Claim-2 would between (what two numbers?)ºC below, or above, the mark? 


September 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

The global temperature anomaly of September 1851 is:-

-0·115ºC. Claim-1.
-0·105ºC. Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1851 were +16ºC, then Claim-1 would be (16 plus 0·115 equals 16·115)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1851 were -16ºC, then Claim-1 would be (16 minus 0·115 equals 15·885)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1851 were neither +16ºC nor -16ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

August 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

The global temperature anomaly of August 1851 is:-

-0·160ºC. Claim-1.
-0·152ºC. Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1851 were +15ºC, then Claim-1 would be (15 plus 0·160 equals 15·160)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1851 were -15ºC, then Claim-1 would be (15 minus 0·160 equals 14·840)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1851 were neither +15ºC nor -15ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

July 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

The global temperature anomaly of July 1851 is:-

-0·220ºC. Claim-1.
-0·213ºC. Claim-2.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1851 were +14ºC, then Claim-1 would be (14 plus 0·220 equals 14·220)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1851 were -14ºC, then Claim-1 would be (14 minus 0·220 equals 13·780)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1851 were neither +14ºC nor -14ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

June 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of June 1851 is -0·194ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of June 1851 is -0·188ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1851 were +13ºC, then Claim-1 would be (13 plus 0·194)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1851 were -13ºC, then Claim-1 would be (13 minus 0·194)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1851 were neither +13ºC nor -13ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

May 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of May 1851 is -0·307ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of May 1851 is -0·300ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1851 were +12ºC, then Claim-1 would be (12 plus 0·307)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1851 were -12ºC, then Claim-1 would be (12 minus 0·307)ºC above the mark, would it not?
If the global temperature anomaly of May 1851 were neither +12ºC nor -12ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

March 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of March 1851 is -0·472ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of March 1851 is -0·482ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1851 were +11ºC, then Claim-1 would be (11 plus 0·472)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1851 were -11ºC, then Claim-1 would be (11 minus 0·472)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1851 were neither +11ºC nor -11ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

February 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of February 1851 is -0·354ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of February 1851 is -0·358ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of  February 1851 were +10ºC, then Claim-1 would be (10 plus 0·354)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1851 were -10ºC, then Claim-1 would be (10 minus 0·354)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1851 were neither +10ºC nor -10ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

January 1851.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of January 1851 is -0·302ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of January 1851 is -0·299ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of  January 1851 were +9ºC, then Claim-1 would be (9 plus 0·302)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1851 were -9ºC, then Claim-1 would be (9 minus 0·302)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1851 were neither +9ºC nor -9ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

December 1850.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of Deember 1850 is -0·268ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of Deember 1850 is -0·267ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1850 were +8ºC, then Claim-1 would be (8 plus 0·268) too low, would it not?
(Q-2) If the global temperature anomaly of December 1850 were -8ºC, then Claim-1 would be (8 minus 0·268) too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1850 were neither +8ºC nor -8ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC too low, or too high?

November 1850.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of November 1850 is -0·194ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of November 1850 is -0·189ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1850 were +7ºC, then Claim-1 would be (7 plus 0·194)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1850 were -7ºC, then Claim-1 would be (7 minus 0·194)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1850 were neither +7ºC nor -7ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC too low, or too high?

October 1850.

Two claims in connection with HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the Unversity of East Anglia.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of October 1850 is -0·456ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of October 1850 is -0·452ºC.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1850 were +6ºC, then Claim-1 would be (6 plus 0·456)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1850 were -6ºC, then Claim-1 would be (6 minus 0·456)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1850 were neither +6ºC nor -6ºC, then Claim-2 would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

September 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of September 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·822ºC and not more than -0·072ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·813ºC and not more than -0·065ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·815ºC and not more than -0·067ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·818ºC and not more than -0·071ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of September 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

August 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of August 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·600ºC and not more than +0·130ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·599ºC and not more than +0·131ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·605ºC and not more than +0·126ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·596ºC and not more than +0·132ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of August 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

July 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of July 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·463ºC and not more than +0·199ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·461ºC and not more than +0·201ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·464ºC and not more than +0·198ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·458ºC and not more than +0·199ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of July 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

June 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of June 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·520ºC and not more than +0·082ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·517ºC and not more than +0·084ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·521ºC and not more than +0·082ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·515ºC and not more than +0·084ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of June 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

May 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of May 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·664ºC and not more than +0·006ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·660ºC and not more than +0·010ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·660ºC and not more than +0·010ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·662ºC and not more than +0·006ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of May 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

April 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of April 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·903ºC and not more than -0·236ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·897ºC and not more than -0·230ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·893ºC and not more than -0·224ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·903ºC and not more than -0·237ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of April 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

March 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of March 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -1·079ºC and not more than -0·382ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -1·076ºC and not more than -0·378ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -1·077ºC and not more than -0·379ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -1·080ºC and not more than -0·383ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of March 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

February 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -0·673ºC and not more than +0·109ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -0·668ºC and not more than +0·115ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -0·675ºC and not more than +0·109ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -0·675ºC and not more than +0·114ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?).

January 1850.

Four claims in relation to HadCrut4.

The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is:-

Claim-1. Not less than -1·092ºC and not more than -0·292ºC.
Claim-2. Not less than -1·087ºC and not more than -0·288ºC.
Claim-3. Not less than -1·098ºC and not more than -0·300ºC.
Claim-4. Not less than -1·102ºC and not more than -0·299ºC.

Question. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is not less than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?) and not more than (what number of degrees centigrade plus or minus what number of degrees centigrade?)

March 1850.

Two claims in relation to HadCrut4 as per The Met. Office Hadley Centre.

Claim-1. The global temperature anomaly of March 1850 is not less than -1·079ºC and not more than -0·382ºC.
Claim-2. The global temperature anomaly of March 1850 is not less than -1·077ºC and not more than -0·379ºC.

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

February 1850 vs March 1850.

Six claims in relation to HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is -0·279ºC
Claim-2a. The global temperature anomaly of Marh 1850 is -0·728ºC
Claim-3a. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is 0·449ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1850.
Link for Claim-1a, Claim-2a, and Claim-3a.

Claim-1b. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is -0·281ºC.
Claim-2b. The global temperature anomaly of March 1850 is -0·732ºC.
Claim-3b. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is 0·451ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1850.
Link for Claim-1b, Claim-2b, and Claim-3b.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1850 were 11ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of March 1850, then Claim-3a would be (11 plus 0·449)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2.  If the global temperature anomaly of February 1850 were 11ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1850, then Claim-3a would be (11 minus 0·449)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1850 were neither 11ºC less than, nor 11ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of March 1850, then Claim-3b would be (what number?)ºC above, or below, the mark?

January 1850 vs February 1850.

Six claims in relation to HadCrut4 as per The Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is -0·690ºC
Claim-2a. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is -0·279ºC
Claim-3a. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is 0·411ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1850.
Link for Claim-1a, Claim-2a, and Claim-3a.

Claim-1b. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is -0·702ºC.
Claim-2b. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is -0·281ºC.
Claim-3b. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is 0·421ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1850.
Link for Claim-1b, Claim-2b, and Claim-3b.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1850 were 10ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1850, then Claim-3a would be (10 plus 0·411)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1850 were 10ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1850, then Claim-3a would be (10 minus 0·411)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1850 were neither 10ºC more than, nor 10ºC less than, the global temperature anomaly of February 1850, then Claim-3b would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

February 1850.

1st claim. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is not less than (-0·673ºC) and not more than (+0·109ºC).
2nd claim. The global temperature anomaly of February 1850 is not less than (-0·668ºC) and not more than (+0·115ºC).

January 1850.

1st claim. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is not less than (-1·092ºC) and not more than (-0·292ºC).
2nd claim. The global temperature anomaly of January 1850 is not less than (-1·087ºC) and not more than (-0·288ºC).

December 1964 vs December 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1886 is -0·278ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1964 is -0·523ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1964 is 0·245ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of December 1886”.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1886 is -0·293ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1964 is -0·529ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of December 1964 is 0·236ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of December 1886”.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1964 were 47ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1886, then Claim-3a would be (47 plus 0·245)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anmaly of December 1964 were 47ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of December 1886, then Claim-3a would be (47 minus 0·245)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1964 were neither 47ºC more than, nor 47ºC less than, the global temperature anomaly of December 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number?)ºC below, or above, the mark?

November 1964 vs November 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1886 is -0·326ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1964 is -0·277ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1964 is 0·049ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1886”.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1886 is -0·343ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1964 is -0·280ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of November 1964 is 0·063ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1886”.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1964 were 46ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of November 1886, then Claim-3a would be (46 plus 0·049)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1964 were 46ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1886, then Claim-3a would be (46 minus 0·049)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1964 were neither 46ºC less than, nor 46ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of November 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number?)ºC above, or below, the mark?

October 1964 vs October 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1886 is -0·650ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1964 is -0·423ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1964 is 0·227ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1886”.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1886 is -0·657ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1964 is -0·426ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of October 1964 is 0·231ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1886”.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1964 were 45ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of October 1886, then Claim-3a would be (45 plus 0·227)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1964 were 45ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1886, then Claim-3a would be (45 minus 0·227)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1964 were neither 45ºC less than, nor 45ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of October 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number?)ºC above, or below, the mark? 

September 1964 vs September 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1886 is -0·119ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1964 is -0·265ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1964 is 0·146ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of September 1886”.
Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1886 is -0·136ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1964 is -0·267ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of September 1964 is 0·131ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of September 1886”.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1964 were 44ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1886, then Claim-3a would be (44 plus 0·146)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1964 were 44ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of September 1886, then Claim-3a would be (44 minus 0·146)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1964 were neither 44ºC more than, nor 44ºC less than, the global temperature anomaly of September 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

Monday, 26 June 2017

August 1964 vs August 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1886 is -0·313ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1964 is -0·270ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1964 is 0·043ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1886”.
Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1886 is -0·320ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1964 is -0·271ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of August 1964 is 0·049ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1886”.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1964 were 43ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of August 1886, then Claim-3a would be (43 plus 0·043)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1964 were 43ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1886, then Claim-3a would be (43 minus 0·043)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1964 were neither 43ºC less than, nor 43ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of August 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

July 1964 vs July 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1886 is -0·274ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1964 is -0·215ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1964 is 0·059ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1886”.
Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1886 is -0·279ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1964 is -0·218ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of July 1964 is 0·061ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1886”.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1964 were 42ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of July 1886, then Claim-3a would be (42 plus 0·059)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1964 were 42ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1886, then Claim-3a would be (42 minus 0·059)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1964 were neither 42ºC less than, nor 42ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of July 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

June 1964 vs June 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1886 is -0·551ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1964 is -0·295ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1964 is 0·256ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1886”.
Date of claims 1a, 2a, and 3a: February 2007.

Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1886 is -0·552ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1964 is -0·297ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of June 1964 is 0·255ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1886”.
Date of claims 1b, 2b, and 3b: November 2012.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1964 were 41ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of June 1886, then Claim-3a would be (41 plus 0·256)ºC above the mark, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1964 were 41ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1886, then Claim-3a would be (41 minus 0·256)ºC below the mark, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1964 were neither 41ºC less than, nor 41ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of June 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

May 1964 vs May 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Date of claims: February 2007.
Claim-1a. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1886 is -0·355ºC”.
Claim-2a. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1964 is -0·207ºC”.
Claim-3a. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1964 is 0·148ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1886”.

Date of claims: November 2012.
Claim-1b. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1886 is -0·356ºC”.
Claim-2b. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1964 is -0·201ºC”.
Claim-3b. “The global temperature anomaly of May 1964 is 0·146ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1886”.

Three questions.
Q-1. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1964 were 40ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of May 1886, then Claim-3a would be (40 plus 0·148)ºC too high, would it not?
Q-2. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1964 were 40ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1886, then Claim-3a would be (40 minus 0·148)ºC too low, would it not?
Q-3. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1964 were neither 40ºC less than, nor 40ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of May 1886, then Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

April 1964 vs April 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

Date of claims: February 2007.
Claim-1a: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1886 is -0·126ºC”.
Claim-2a: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1964 is -0·278ºC”.
Claim-3a: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1964 is 0·152ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of April 1886”.

Date of claims: November 2012.
Claim-1b: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1886 is -0·137ºC”.
Claim-2b: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1964 is -0·279ºC”.
Claim-3b: “The global temperature anomaly of April 1964 is 0·142ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of April 1886”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1964 were 39ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1886, then Claim-3a would be (39 plus 0·152)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of April 1964 were 39ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of April 1886, then Claim-3b would be (39 minus 0·142)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of April 1964 were neither 39ºC more than, nor 39ºC less than, the global temperature anomaly of April 1886, then Claim-3a would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too low, or too high, and Claim-3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?  

March 1964 vs March 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

02/2007. (Claim #1a) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1886 is -0·637ºC”, and (Claim #2a) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1964 is -0.381ºC”, such that (Claim #3a) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1964 is 0·256ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1886”.
11/2012. (Claim #1b) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1886 is -0·640ºC”, and (Claim #2b) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1964 is -0·382ºC”, such that (Claim #3b) “The global temperature anomaly of March 1964 is 0·258ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1886”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1964 were 38ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of March 1886, then Claim #3a would be (38 plus 0·256)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1964 were 38ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1886, then Claim #3b would be (38 minus 0·258)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1964 were neither 38ºC less than, nor 38ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of March 1886, then Claim #3a would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low, and Claim #3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too low, or too high?

February 1964 vs February 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

02/2007. (Claim #1a) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1886 is -0·775ºC”, and (Claim #2a) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1964 is -0.292ºC”, such that (Claim #3a) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1964 is 0·483ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1886”.
11/2012. (Claim #1b) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1886 is -0·794ºC”, and (Claim #2b) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1964 is -0·293ºC”, such that (Claim #3b) “The global temperature anomaly of February 1964 is 0·501ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1886”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1964 were 37ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1886, then Claim #3a would be (37 plus 0·483)ºC too high, would it not? If the global  temperature anomaly of February 1964 were 37ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1886, then Claim #3b would be (37 minus 0·501)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of February 1964 were neither 37ºC less than, nor 37ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of February 1886, then Claim #3a would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low, and Claim #3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too low, or too high?

January 1964 vs January 1886.

Six claims in relation to CruTem as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia.

02/2007. (Claim #1a) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1886 is -0·529ºC”, and (Claim #2a) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1964 is +0.004ºC”, such that (Claim #3a) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1964 is 0·533ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1886”.
11/2012. (Claim #1b) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1886 is -0·541ºC”, and (Claim #2b) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1964 is +0·001ºC”, such that (Claim #3b) “The global temperature anomaly of January 1964 is 0·542ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1886”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1964 were 36ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of January 1886, then Claim #3a would be (36 plus 0·533)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of January 1964 were 36ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1886, then Claim #3b would be (36 minus 0·542)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of January 1964 were neither 36ºC less than, nor 36ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of January 1886, then Claim #3a would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low, and Claim #3b would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too low, or too high?

December 1963 vs December 1885.

Two claims as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia in relation to CruTem.

1st claims (02/2007).  “The global temperature anomaly of December 1963 is 0·209ºC less than the global land surface air temperature anomaly of December 1885”.
2nd claims (11/2012). “The global temperature anomaly of December 1963 is 0·216ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of December 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1963 were 35ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1885, then the 1st claim would be (35 plus 0·209)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of December 1963 were 35ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1885, then the 2nd claim would be (35 minus 0·216)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of December 1963 were neither 35ºC more than, nor 35ºC less than, the global temperature anomaly of December 1885, then either claim would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too low, or too high?

Sunday, 25 June 2017

November 1963 vs November 1885.

Two guesses as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia in relation to CruTem.

1st guess (02/2007).  “The global temperature anomaly of November 1963 is 0·349ºC more than the global land surface air temperature anomaly of November 1885”.
2nd guess (11/2012). “The global temperature anomaly of November 1963 is 0·365ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1963 were 34ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of November 1885, then the 1st guess would be (34 plus 0·349)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of November 1963 were 33ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (34 minus 0·365)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of November 1963 were neither 34ºC less than, nor 34ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of November 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

October 1963 vs October 1885.

Two guesses as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia in relation to CruTem.

1st guess (02/2007).  “The global temperature anomaly of October 1963 is 0·544ºC more than the global land surface air temperature anomaly of October 1885”.
2nd guess (11/2012). “The global temperature anomaly of October 1963 is 0·574ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1963 were 33ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of October 1885, then the 1st guess would be (33 plus 0·544)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of October 1963 were 33ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (33 minus 0·574)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of October 1963 were neither 33ºC less than, nor 33ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of October 1885, then either guess is (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

September 1963 vs September 1885.

Two guesses as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia in relation to CruTem3.

1st guess (02/2007).  “The global temperature anomaly of September 1963 is 0·281ºC more than the global land surface air temperature anomaly of September 1885”.
2nd guess (11/2012). “The global temperature anomaly of September 1963 is 0·297ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1963 were 32ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of September 1885, then the 1st guess would be (32 plus 0·281)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of September 1963 were 32ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (32 minus 0·297)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of September 1963 were neither 32ºC less than, nor 32ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of September 1885, then either claim would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

August 1963 vs August 1885.

Two guesses as per The Climatic Research Unit At The University of East Anglia in relation to CruTem3.

1st guess (02/2007).  “The global temperature anomaly of August 1963 is 0·435ºC more than the global land surface air temperature anomaly of August 1885”.
2nd guess (11/2012). “The global temperature anomaly of August 1963 is 0·451ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1963 were 31ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of August 1885, then the 1st guess would be (31 plus 0·435)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of August 1963 were 31ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (31 minus 0·451)ºC too low, would it not? if the global temperature anomaly of August 1963 were neither 31ºC less than, nor 31ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of August 1885, the either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

July 1963 vs July 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of July 1963 is 0·15ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1885”.
2nd guess (25/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of July 1963 is 0·67ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1963 were 31ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of July 1885, then the 1st guess would be (31 plus 0·15)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of July 1963 were 31ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (31`minus 0·67)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of July 1963 were neither 31ºC less than, nor 31ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of July 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

June 1963 vs June 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of June 1963 is 0·51ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1885”.
2nd guess (25/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of June 1963 is 0·98ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1963 were 30ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of June 1885, then the 1st guess guess would be (30 plus 0·51)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of June 1963 were 30ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (30 minus 0·98)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of June 1963 were neither 30ºC less than, nor 30ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of June 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low? 

May 1963 vs May 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of May 1963 is 0·21ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1885”.
2nd guess (25/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of May 1963 is 0·37ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1963 were 29ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of May 1885, the the 1st guess would be (29 plus 0·21)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of May 1963 were 29ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (29 minus 0·37)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of May 1963 were neither 29ºC less than, nor 29ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of May 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

Saturday, 24 June 2017

April 1963 vs April 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of April 1963 is 0·24ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1885”.
2nd guess (24/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of April 1963 is 0·69ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1963 were 28ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of April 1885, then the 1st guess would be (28 plus 0·24)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of April 1963 were 28ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (28 minus 0·69)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of April 1963 is neither 28ºC less than, nor 28ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of April 1885, then either guess is (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

March 1963 vs March 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of March 1963 is 0·33ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1885”.
2nd guess (24/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of March 1963 is 0·69ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1963 were 27ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of March 1885, then the 1st guess would be (27 plus 0·33)ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1963 were 27ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (27 minus 0·69)ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1963 were neither 27ºC less than, nor 27ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of March 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) too high, or too low?

February 1963 vs February 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of February 1963 is 0·71ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1885”.
2nd guess (24/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of February 1963 is 1·03ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1963 were 26ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1885, then the 1st guess would be (26 plus 0·71)ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of February 1963 were 26ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (26 minus 1·03)ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of February 1963 were neither 26ºC less than, nor 26ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of February 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

January 1963 vs January 1885.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of January 1963 is 0·56ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1885”.
2nd guess (24/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of January 1963 is 0·92ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1885”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of January 1963 were 25ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of January 1885 then the 1st guess would be (25 plus 0·56)ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of January 1963 were 25ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of January 1885, then the 2nd guess would be (25 minus 0·92)ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of January 1963 were neither 25ºC less than, nor 25ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of January 1885, then either guess would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

December 1962 vs December 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of December 1962 is 0·83ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1884”.
2nd guess (24/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of December 1962 is 1·01ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of December 1962 were 24ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of December 1884, then the 1st guess would be (24 plus 0·83)ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of December 1962 were 24ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of December 1884, then the 2nd guess would be (24 minus 1·01)ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of December 1962 were neither 24ºC less than, nor 24ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of December 1884, then either of the two claims would be (what number of degrees centigrade?) above, or below, the mark?

Friday, 23 June 2017

November 1962 vs November 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of November 1962 is 0·70ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of November 1962 is 0·94ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of November 1962 were 23ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of November 1884, then the 1st guess would be [23 plus 0·70]ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of November 1962 were 23ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of November 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [23 minus 0·94]ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of November 1962 were neither 23ºC less than, nor 23ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of November 1884, then the 1st guess would be [what number?]ºC too high, or too low, and the 2nd guess would be [what number?]ºC too low, or too high?

October 1962 vs October 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of October 1962 is 0·47ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of October 1962 is 0·81ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of October 1962 were 22ºC less than than the global temperature anomaly of October 1884, then the 1st guess would be [22 plus 0·22]ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of October 1962 were 22ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of October 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [22 minus 0·81]ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of October 1962 were neither 22ºC less than, nor 22ºC more than, then the 1st guess would be [what number?]ºC too high, or too low, and the 2nd guess would be [what number?]ºC too low, or too high?

September 1962 vs September 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of September 1962 is 0·25ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of September 1962 is 0·40ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of September 1962 were 22ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of September 1884, then the 1st guess would be [22 plus 0·25]ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of September 1962 were 22ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of September 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [22 minus 0·40]ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of September 1962 were neither 22ºC less than, nor 22ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of September 1884, then the 1st guess would be [what number?]ºC too high, or too low, and the 2nd guess would be [what number?]ºC too low, or too high?

August 1962 vs August 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of August 1962 is 0·02ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of August 1962 is 0·22ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of August 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of August 1962 were 21ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of August 1884, then the 1st guess would be [21 plus 0·02]ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of August 1962 were 21ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of August 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [21 plus 0·22]ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of August 1962 were neither 21ºC less than, nor 21ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of August 1884, then the 1st guess would be [what number?]ºC too high, or too low, and the 2nd guess would be [what number?]ºC too low, or too high?

July 1962 vs July 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of July 1962 is 0·42ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of July 1962 is 0·73ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of July 1962 were 20ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of July 1884, then the 1st guess would be [20 plus 0·42]ºC too high, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of July 1962 were 20ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of July 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [20 minus 0·73]ºC too low, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of July 1962 is neither 20ºC less than, nor 20ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of July 1884, then the 1st guess is [what number?]ºC too high, or too low, and the 2nd guess is [what number?]ºC too low, or too high?

June 1962 vs June 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of June 1962 is 0·29ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1884”.
2nd guess (23/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of June 1962 is 0·72ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of June 1962 were 19ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of June 1884, then the 1st guess would be [19 plus 0·29]ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of June 1962 were 19ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of June 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [19 minus 0·72]ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of June 1962 is neither 19ºC less than, nor 19ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of June 1884, then the 1st guess is [what number?]ºC above, or below, the mark, and the 2nd guess is [what number?]ºC below, or above, the mark?

Thursday, 22 June 2017

May 1962 vs May 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of May 1962 is 0·59ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1884”.
2nd guess (22/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of May 1962 is 1·10ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of May 1962 were 18ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of May 1884, then the 1st guess would be [18 plus 0·59]ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of May 1962 were 18ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of May 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [18 minus 1·10]ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of May 1962 is neither 18ºC less than, nor 18ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of May 1884, then either guess is [what number]ºC above, or below, the mark?

April 1962 vs April 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of April 1962 is 0·82ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1884”.
2nd guess (22/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of April 1962 is 1·00ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of April 1962 were 17ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of April 1884, then the 1st guess would be [17 plus 0·82]ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly April 1962 were 17ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of April 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [17 minus 1·00]ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of April 1962 is neither 17ºC less than, nor 17ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of April 1884, then either guess is [what number?]ºC above, or below, the mark?

March 1962 vs March 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of March 1962 is 0·34ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1884”.
2nd guess (22/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of March 1962 is 0·51ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of March 1962 were 16ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of March 1884, then the 1st guess would be [16 plus 0·34]ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1962 were 16ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of March 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [16 minus 0·51]ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of March 1962 is neither 16ºC less than, nor 16ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of March 1884, then either guess is [what number?]ºC above, or below, the mark?

February 1962 vs February 1884.

Two guesses as per NASA's Goddard Institute For Space Studies.

1st guess (28/12/2009).  “The global temperature anomaly of February 1962 is 0·10ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1884”.
2nd guess (22/06/2017). “The global temperature anomaly of February 1962 is 0·50ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1884”.

Three questions. If the global temperature anomaly of February 1962 were 15ºC less than the global temperature anomaly of February 1884, then the 1st guess would be be [15 plus 0·10]ºC above the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of February 1962 were 15ºC more than the global temperature anomaly of February 1884, then the 2nd guess would be [15 minus 0·50]ºC below the mark, would it not? If the global temperature anomaly of February 1962 is neither 15ºC less than, nor 15ºC more than, the global temperature anomaly of February 1884, then either guess is [what number?]ºC above, or below, the mark?